The Common Good

Articles By Kate Bowman

They're reading liberation theology and listening to the world's urban poor. Meet the young evangelicals of Word Made Flesh.
Political power and the hip-hop generation.
Soul Journey, by Gillian Welch.
The sex trade is often seen as an industry that plagues remote developing countries, but a Washington, D.C. conference in July broke that stereotype
Church organizations in Malawi supported by Norwegian and Danish Church Aid have been told to "vigorously" advocate gender and human rights issues. 
The land is God's gift to everyone," affirmed leaders from Latin American and U.S. churches in a statement supporting Brazil's Landless Workers Movement.
The Conference of Evangelical Churches of Guatemala vigorously protested a ruling by the Guatemalan Constitutional Court
Tired of the clear-cut lumber you get at Home Depot and Lowe's? The Canadian Eco-Lumber Co-op lets you feel good about your wood.
President Bush completed a five-day, five-nation tour of Africa this summer, promising those he met that they are not alone in their fight against AIDS.
Nicknamed the "Blue Nuns" for the blue habits they used to wear, the Catholic sisters of the Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary have renovated their motherhouse and campus...
How Does Your Company Measure Up?
In April, Saskatchewan's Rosthern Junior College sponsored "In Exile...For A While," a new youth immersion program launched by the Mennonite Central Committee...
In Nairobi, 700 children walked out of school and through the streets this April, calling for an end to their country's debt burden.
Standing for peace in a war zone is never easy, but it's becoming next to impossible for Middle East human rights groups.
This spring Europe was rocked by a religious fashion war when the Danish superstore Kvickly started selling flip-flop sandals featuring images of Jesus and Mary.
Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva met with Catholic bishops in May to discuss his Zero Hunger Program.
A new report from the University of North Carolina's National Study of Youth and Religion confirms the old saw: A family that prays together, stays together.
Harbor City Services Inc.
Cistercian monks in southern Poland hope to become the country's first distributors of an ale brewed from a 17th century recipe.
Planning a stint in the federal pen? Don't leave home without Clare Hanrahan's Jailed for Justice: A Woman's Guide to Federal Prison Camp.
In Image and Spirit, author and artist Karen Stone recounts comments she overheard in a modern art museum one November day
As if there weren't enough reasons to get rid of your cell phone, a new study from the Worldwatch Institute reports that coltan—the mineral that keeps cell phones and other electronic eq
Lance Corporal Stephen Eagle Funk, 20, (second from left) turns himself in at his Marine Corps reserve unit after refusing to serve in the Iraq war.
A Jesuit priest in southern India, along with local Jesuit school students, has launched an AIDS-awareness campaign conducted mostly by children orphaned by the disease.
Calling herself "Aly," the Episcopal bishop of Rhode Island, Geralyn Wolf, spent the month of January on the streets, befriending the homeless and sleeping and eating in shelters.
Interest in conscientious objection is on the rise among members of the U.S. military, according to several indicators.
Tom Ciola, creator of the Bible Bar and a host of spiritual snack foods at Logia Foods, just released his newest treat: Bible Granola.
Labor Rites.
A coalition of Latino religious leaders from 17 states is fighting for amnesty for thousands of undocumented workers in the United States.
Following a two-year organizing drive by students and faculty at the University of New Mexico, the university became the first in the United States to adopt a policy against investment in World Bank bonds.
Arguing that "character counts," the United Church of Christ is pressuring all 50 state public utility commissioners to investigate WorldCom and revoke its local licenses...
Several religious bodies recently testified before the U.N. Commission on Human Rights about religious intolerance and discrimination in Pakistan. "
Building Supplies
In Israel, is it now okay to kill Americans?
For too long civic participation in the arts has been viewed as the domain of the wealthy, but a new study by the Urban Institute suggests otherwise.
Rachel Corrie, 23, of Olympia, Washington, was killed March 16 when she was run over by an Israeli military bulldozer, moments after the photo at right was taken.
The San Francisco-based Global AIDS Interfaith Alliance received a $1 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to fight HIV/AIDS in Malawi, Africa.
When public high schools opened their doors last fall, military recruiters lined up to get personal student data.
In January, Maine Interfaith Power and Light—an electricity-purchasing group rooted in the faith community—announced the availability of two green electricity options for homeowners in Maine.
For years activists have called attention to the plight of the Palestinians through protests, teach-ins, and seminars.
Healing Hope. Family members of Sept. 11 victims traveled on a peace mission to Iraq in January.
It's ironic that peace often brings strife.
Eighty-six human rights advocates from across the United States were tried in January and February in federal court for nonviolent civil disobedience
EvangeCube slaps the entire mystery of salvation on a Rubik-style cube, enabling instant conversions in friends, family, and neighbors. Flip one way and you'll see our fall from grace.
Pro-life demonstrators protested the D.C. government's use of surveillance cameras during the January March for Life
Building Supplies
Preparing Christian agents of urban change.
Recently the Associated Press identified some of the fundamental changes to Americans' legal rights by the Bush administration through the USA Patriot Act and the Office of Homeland Security: