The Common Good

Blog Posts By Andrew Wilkes

Posted by Andrew Wilkes 2 years 21 weeks ago
On February 26, 2012 in Sanford, Fla., George Zimmerman shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old boy. Zimmerman, 28, a neighborhood watch "captain," says he was acting in self-defense, and — incredibly — Zimmerman has yet to be arrested or charged with a crime. However, thanks to the organizing efforts of Mr. Martin’s parents, civil rights groups, media commentaries, and concerned citizens, our latest racialized miscarriage of criminal justice is now getting the widespread attention that it deserves. On Monday, the US Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) announced it would launch an independent investigation into the causes and circumstances of Mr. Martin’s death.
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 4 years 12 weeks ago
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 4 years 16 weeks ago
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 4 years 18 weeks ago
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 4 years 21 weeks ago
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 5 years 24 weeks ago
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 5 years 51 weeks ago
Evangelical women and minorities, it seems, exist on the muted margins of political discourse in America. If a justice revival is to sweep over America once more, from the suburban megachurch to the urban storefront church, then Christians must pursue a vision of the common good for all -- and not the common good of a few. The public narratives of the media often chronicle the broadening social concerns of white [...]
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 6 years 2 weeks ago
At long last the wheels of Washington have rolled out a bill to address the housing crisis! On July 30, President Bush signed the Housing and Economy Recovery Act into law. Despite its imperfections, the bill establishes an important provision for extremely low-income Americans -- the National Affordable Housing Trust Fund (NHTF). This fund will provide much-needed resources for [...]
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 6 years 3 weeks ago
Impatience can be destructive. But it can also be a catalyst to work for social change. In this sense, one could argue that impatience can be holy in some respects. As a Sojourners intern, this summer is my introduction to Capitol Hill, to the rich landscape of D.C., and, yes, to the bewilderingly slow grind of Washington politics. For the last month or so, I have been tracking the progress of proposals to address the housing crisis.
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 6 years 6 weeks ago
Recently, I participated in a conference call based on a report from The Task Force For A Responsible Withdrawal From Iraq. The report argued that the United States can and should do the following: quickly withdraw American military forces from Iraq, "carefully pursue diplomatic remedies for the Iraq crisis," and "generously give to help rebuild Iraq in the long run." For the policy wonks, the report offers
Posted by Andrew Wilkes 6 years 8 weeks ago
Recently I had the privilege of attending a health-care debate at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. Inspired by Denzel Washington's The Great Debaters, two groups of five people debated the following resolution: Government-sponsored health care programs should be expanded to cover the uninsured. The group arguing against the aforementioned resolution carried the day. They dismantled their opposition by critiquing [...]