The Common Good

Afternoon Links of Awesomeness: Tuesday Nov. 15, 2011

Is There Room for Religion in New Anti-Bullying Legislation?
In light of Lady Gaga’s new campaign to combat bullying, plus the passing of Michigan’s new bullying legislation, a recent post on Get Religion asks: “Would anti-bullying legislation forbid us from talking about our religious views?” With ambiguous language used in the new proposals, the deeper question about the nature and definition of bullying has begun to surface.

 

Reality TV's Latest Sensation: All American Muslim
TLC’s newest series, All-American Muslim, depicts the lives of Muslim-American families as they “struggle to balance faith and nationality in a post-9/11 world.” After the first episode aired, Su’ad Abdul Khabeer writes on Religion Dispatches that when the media isn’t talking about Islam and terrorism, they’re talking about Islam and the role of women (which was the subject of the first episode). In her evaluation of the new series, Abdual Khabeer critically engages it, exposing its troupes, praising its strengths, and looking toward a future of conversation. For more coverage on All-American Muslim, see the CNN clip below. 

 

Hunger and Hunger-Related Illness Fuels 'God's Love We Deliver'
Calling all New Yorkers, this weekend Race to Deliver is hosting its 18th annual God’s Love We Deliver run in Central Park. The race is meant to be a symbol showing the collective efforts of those uniting to combat hunger and hunger-related illnesses. While registration is closed to participants, many runners are seeking support monetarily, physically, and spiritually.

 

Health Care Meets Occupiers Right Where They Are
While universal health care is yet to spread across the nation, a group of physicians in the New York are providing free medical care to the occupiers (and pets) in Zucotti Park. In a recent commentary on this action, Good editor Cord Jefferson writes, “It's all a far cry from a functional single-payer health care system, of course. But it's evidence that a dedicated group of people willing to sacrifice some time and money for the sake of others can benefit the well-being of everyone.” Meanwhile, the occupiers are heading into their second month of residency in New York City.  

 

Chocolate University Harvests Community
Chocolate University – a small collective of artisan chocolate enthusiasts – takes cocoa and justice seriously. Located in Springfield, Missouri, the small organization imports its beans directly from farmers in the Philippines, Tanzania, Ecuador, and Honduras, allowing them to use single origin cocoa beans for products while also partnering in fair profit sharing for farmers, communities, and neighborhoods. Students at the U.S. program also reach out to educate their local community. At Pipkin Middle School, students interact with the university to form a connection with Malagos Elementary School in Davao, Philippines. Read about the unique effects this program is having in their community and in communities around the world.      

 

Bill McKibben's Theology of Stewardship  
Last weekend activist Bill McKibben spoke with Religion Dispatches about environmental stewardship. On Sunday, surrounded by thousands of people at the White House opposing the construction of the Keystone pipeline, McKibben shares: “I don’t worry all that much about the theology. Everyone can easily see a justification for getting involved in this fight, whether it's stewardship or love of neighbor. And once someone is actually actively engaged in the fight, the theology starts to follow. Praxis, as they say. You break away from being I-dolatrous (which is the basic problem here, I think) when you engage in common action, shoulder to shoulder.”  Click here for more on the Keystone Pipeline.

 

Three Cheers for God!
The latest debate intersecting the realms of American sports and Christianity is over Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow and his frequent, and some might say excessive, public expressions of faith. Tebow has been attracting enormous coverage on ESPN, but more recently in the New York Times. Read an evaluation of Tebow’s religion and its media coverage via Get Religion.  

 

"I'll Be Your Friend, I'll Help You Carry On..."
And in case you missed R.E.M’s Michael Stipe, producer/musician Brian Eno, and comic virtuoso Stephen Colbert sing “Lean on Me,” the break-out trio give their take on the classic neo-spiritual on last week’s Report. See the video below.

Joshua Witchger is a web assistant at Sojourners.

 

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