The Common Good

Weekly Wrap 8.8.14: The 10 Best Stories You Missed This Week


1. U.S Considers Air Strikes and Air Drops to Help Iraqis Trapped on Mountain by ISIS
"The move comes as Qaraqosh, Iraq's largest Christian city, was all but abandoned as the jihadist group Islamic State (Isis) advanced through minority communities in the country's north-west and towards the Kurdish stronghold of Irbil."

2. Inclusive Language for God Does Note Equal Heresy
Rachel Marie Stone brings it on her Religion News Service blog, calling out the criticism of Gungor for supposed 'drift from biblical orthodoxy' for 'experiments with female metaphors for God' among other 'heresies.'

3. What Is Really Happening in Iraq? 
"In June, ISIS overran the northern capital of Mosul and began a violent march southward, proclaiming the imminent destruction of Kerbala, Najaf, and Baghdad — strongholds of Shi’a religious and political power. Sectarianism reignited and militias re-armed. ISIS was a Sunni problem and the Shi’a were either fleeing or beating their chests in fear. So, these few weeks later, with Christians and others being marked and driven from their homes, a Muslim movement that says, 'We are all Christians,' is subversive in the most daring of ways."

4. Dear Fashion Industry, Please Stop Glamorizing Rape
Fashion is a powerful medium and it can have a big influence in a vast country like India—and the world over. The more we depict violence against women in beautiful, glamorous ways, the more we normalize this violence.

5. Why the U.S.-Africa Summit Now? 
This week, Washington, D.C. hosted the U.S.-Africa Summit with leaders from 50 African countries attending. Why now? Forbes explains the history, and Bloomberg Intelligence shares its in-depth analysis, Africa Rising. For example, did you know that by the end of this century, 4 out of 10 of the world’s youth will be African?

6. Ann Coulter's Strange God Renders Her Blind
Ann Coulter uttered some nonsense about Ebola-infected Dr. Kent Brantly and the apparent uselessness of helping people. Enter Elizabeth Scalia, with some wise words for anyone attempting to make sense of Coulter's statements: "Make no mistake, what Ann Coulter has shown us is her Strange God, the one wrapped up in red-white-and-blue. Coulter’s “patriotism” … stands so profoundly between her and the Creator that she can no longer see anything but the stars and stripes, and the mythical 'city on a hill,' which looks like heaven to her, its glowing nimbus all that prevents the world from a thousand years of darkness."

7. Revolution on Sorority Row
Kayla Webley reports on modern-day segregation in one of the nation's largest college Greek systems. "You'd think it was 1954 at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, where stepping inside the secret chapter rooms of sorority rush reveals a pre-Civil Rights Movement mind-set. But last fall, a group of women—black and white—stood up to the backward traditions that have kept the nation's largest Greek system segregated well into the 21st century."

8. A Growing Movement to Spread Faith, Love — And Clean Laundry
More than 70 churches, mosques and synagogues around the country have adopted "Laundry Love"— a ministry that raises money to pay for detergent, dryer sheets, and quarters for machines.

9. We Have to See Justice as Part of Discipleship and Ultimately … Our Worship of God
From Eugene Cho: "We must not just seek justice but live justly. Justice work and just living are part of our discipleship. Justice contributes to our worship of God. Justice is worship."

10. Comprehensive Investigation of Voter Impersonation Finds 31 Credible Incidents out of 1 Billion
A professor at the Loyola University Law School and an expert in constitutional law talks voter ID legislation.

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