The Common Good
My dad's best friend Leo explained that he managed the land. Rudolf Vlcek/Shutte

Being in and working with creation is much more fulfilling than using it up or keeping it at a distance. God calls us into the creation: into the woods, into the worm-filled, muddy soil of our flowerpots.

Buy less, borrow more Lorelyn Medina/Shutterstock

Every family, including my own, has its “keepers” and “givers.” There are those who keep and hoard every tiny little trinket, every old letter, and every unneeded refrigerator magnet. Then, on the other side of the spectrum, there are others who give away every extraneous and unused thing, living in radical simplicity.

Oil spill cleanup, Arun Roisri / Shutterstock.com

Occurrences of oil spills in several states have garnered little media attention in the last few years. In some cases, prompt reports are recorded, yet in others, days have gone by before the authorities are alerted and the spill becomes public knowledge.

Pile of textbooks, Skylines / Shutterstock.com

Texas high school biology textbooks battles are once again in progress in Austin, with lines drawn between those who want textbook material based only on established mainstream science and those who are anti-science.

Download our free discussion guide for people of faith from Sojourners' Creation Care Campaign, to accompany the documentary film Chasing Ice.

About Sojourners Creation Care

“God saw everything that God had made, and indeed, it was very good” (Genesis 1:31). The earth and the fragile atmosphere that blankets it are God’s good creation for the sustenance and enjoyment of all living things. In Scripture, Christians are called by God to be stewards of the earth. Our policies and practices must protect creation from interests and activities that damage it.

Human-induced climate change is responsible for major ecological disruptions that impact the poor and vulnerable first and most heavily.  From low-income residents of New York City to subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, those who are most affected by environmental degradation are those who are least able to respond.

Through our Creation Care programs, Sojourners is living out the biblical call of stewardship by working with a diverse group of partners to educate Christians about the need to reverse climate change, advance policies that prioritize clean air and water, and promote individual and legislative actions that support efficient, sustainable, and renewable energy sources. 

Follow Sojourners Creation Care

From the Magazine & Blog

As climate change devastates communities in Kenya, church leaders are helping to address the crisis locally while also calling on industrialized nations to own up to their responsibilities for spewing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere.
Rather than celebrate the quirkiness of the blessing of the animals itself, I would like to speak to St. Francis as an icon for justice whose way of organizing and advocacy is not only rooted in Christianity, but may just provide the necessary strategy for handling a major justice issue of our time: Do all God’s creatures have a place in God’s house?
Dare to go there with me, if you will. What if we imagine God’s vineyard as described in Matthew 21 to be this beautiful world we inhabit? What will happen if we reject it—if we continue to treat it with disrespect, fail to listen to its natural woes, dismiss the warning signs it gives us? What if God is keeping score? Oh. Dear. Might I remind us all, that if we do not tend to this earth, we are only inevitably hurting ourselves and the lives of future generations? This is why, like never before, over one thousand groups and individuals, including various faith groups, businesses, peace activists, social justice groups, schools, and environmentalists from all over the country united for the largest climate march in history on Sunday, September 21, gaining international attention. The People’s Climate March, held in New York City, was the perfect moment to take a stand, create a buzz, and create the much-needed public influence and pressure as NYC prepared to welcome decision-makers from across the globe to discuss this very topic.
We all know that the world is moving down a very dangerous path, and that we must reverse our direction. But so far, the credible and persuasive scientific case hasn’t accomplished that. Sensible economic proposals haven’t halted that direction either. And smart political arguments have yet to reverse our course either. Why? Because we are addicted to fossil fuels. The results are planet-threatening climate change and people-threatening terrorism. We need conversion. Nothing less. Only our conversion could change our dangerous direction. Two fundamental things could bring the kind of conversion we need. One, our faith. Two, our children.
More important than the celebrities or politicians marching on Sunday, members of the faith community came out in droves to support the rally. The Huffington Post reported on the wide variety of faiths that were represented at the march. A reporter from Christianity Today wrote, “Almost every conceivable strand of society was represented in the huge column of humanity — not only were there groups of Methodists and Baptists rubbing shoulders with Catholics and Presbyterians, there were Christians marching with Muslims, Jews, pagans, atheists and Baha'i. Anti-capitalist protesters stood alongside 'Concerned Moms for the Climate;' doctors, firemen, and vegans held banners next to indigenous people and victims of Hurricane Katrina.” The reasons that thousands of individuals came out to the streets of New York City on Sunday are vast and personal. But for many members of the faith community, spreading awareness about the decaying state of God’s creation was a moral obligation. Signs such as “Jesus Would Drive a Prius” and a life-size moving Arkrepresented the importance of taking care of God’s creation throughout the rally. In a recent interview with the National Catholic Reporter, Steffano Montano, a theology professor at Barry University in Miami, said as a Catholic, there's a spiritual responsibility to combat climate change. "By understanding creation, we can come closer to the Creator. It's an added spiritual responsibility. Justice for the earth is something that affects everybody. It's going to affect my daughter, my grandkids. It affects the poor in ways we are still trying to come to terms with. And it's our fault. So that's why we're here. It's on us to make a difference," said Montano.