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The recent agreement with Iran relating to its nuclear program is totally in keeping with the requirement of Just War Doctrine that the military use of force be considered only as a court of last resort. Despite the fears of the naysayers, pressing ahead with nonviolent options as the Western powers are currently doing is absolutely the right thing to do.

Obama has personally ordered drone strikes. Keith Tarrier and spirit of america

As we seek faithful ways to engage governments with the spirit of Jesus's love and reconciliation, it is vitally important for us to reject our country's capitulation to violence and refuse to let it be the norm.

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Within five years, the Bush administration's misguided invasion of Iraq has transformed under the Obama administration into preemptive assassinations halfway around the world. Dirty Wars author Jeremy Scahill sat down with Sojourners to discuss his book, documentary, and the moral implications of drone warfare.

Newtown prayer vigil in April. Photo by Brandon Hook / Sojourners

Yesterday, as the culmination of its No More Names bus tour, which reached 25 states in 100 days, Mayors Against Illegal Guns rallied at the Capitol to urge Congress to pass a bill enforcing mandatory background checks for potential gun owners.

Graphic from "Sorrow, Anger, ACTION! - A Gathering of Voices Against Gun Violenc

I will never forget walking onto the National Mall in early April, 2013. I was overcome by the sight of more than 3,300 crosses and other religious symbols rising from the heart of our capital city, representing the graves of all who have died by gunfire since the shooting massacre at Newtown, Conn. 

About Sojourners Peace & Nonviolence

In a world marred by violence and destruction, we must remember the words of Jesus: Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God (Matthew 5:9).

Our world faces a major challenge of how to resolve conflicts, reduce violence, and defeat terrorism without preemptive war. War has too often become the first choice instead of the last resort. In a world with terrorists, terrorist states, unilateralist superpowers, and weapons of mass destruction, alternatives to an endless cycle of violence are needed. As an organization, we articulate the prophetic call to peace and help Christians engage their political leaders to seek alternatives to war.

Sojourners has an historic commitment to confronting violence and being a consistent witness to the Biblical call for peacemaking. Founded in the 1970s, at the height of the Vietnam War, our initial mission was to bring the call to end that war into the evangelical church. In the years since, we have played a leading role in the movement for nuclear disarmament, opposing the first Gulf War, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and threats of attack against Iran.  

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From the Magazine & Blog

An Islamist group has gained ground in the northeastern Libyan city of Benghazi, declaring it an Islamic territory and raising fears that radical Islamist militias may spread in the rest of Africa. The declaration from Libya’s Ansar al-Sharia movement mirrors the rise of the Islamic State in northern Iraq and Syria. The two militant movements share similar goals. The prospect of more fighting and the possible disintegration of Libya, the country where NATO allied forces helped topple strongman Moammar Gadhafi in October 2011, sent chills throughout the nation. “I think this is a risky way to go,” said Sheikh Saliou Mbacke, a Senegalese Muslim leader who is the coordinator of Inter-Faith Action for Peace in Africa. “It hinges on the failure of the governments, lack of democracy and poor and unequal distribution of resources,” added Saliou. These latest actions reflect the growing influence of Islamists in Africa, where militants are challenging existing governments.
The borders now vanishing in the Middle East – the most radical transformations of the map here since the post-WWI Sykes Picot agreement – are being redrawn in chaos and fear. The bubbles that burst here are the hopes for peace in a world avid for control of this region and its resources.
Despite the swell of division and resulting violence, part of the issue is that we have such a sharply tuned and inexhaustible news cycle that places every tragedy, from St. Louis to Ukraine, right before us, morning and night. But this isn’t to say we’re not experiencing an unusual spike in our interracial, intercultural, and international conflicts.
If military action needs to be taken to protect civilians from further ISIS aggression, it should be multilateral not unilateral. American leadership no doubt will remain important, but the authorization for any forceful measures must come from the Security Council.
The fact is, violence has not only failed to create stability, in many ways it has acted to exacerbate the situation of instability and injustice which fuels terrorism. Violence does not stop violence, instead it causes it to escalate like a wildfire burning out of control.