The Common Good

Uncommon seeks to address racial and economic divides by offering college campuses a race and poverty speaking tour that will build and strengthen the capacity of your community to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity. Find out how to bring the Tour to your church or campus!

Photo by Seph Kumer (First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant)

"[Lisa] awoke my senses to the beauty and amazement of the gospel. She spoke it with such fresh words and insight. She opened her mouth, and the Spirit of God poured out onto this dry and thirsty heart of mine. I felt as if I was once again alive to God's call for justice in this world.”

Discussion guides, documentaries, books, magazine articles, and more. Find all of the ways you can start the conversation about The Budget and Your Neighbor.

About Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

Racial and economic division persists in our world and within the body of Christ. The Uncommon Tour helps college campuses and churches to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity for the common good. Through preaching, teaching, and training Uncommon equips communities to engage issues of justice in the public square in a way that draws from the roots of Christianity and leads to ongoing advocacy in partnership with “the least of these.”

Learn more about the issues and solutions

 

Hear what others are saying about UnCommon

 

Invite the UnCommon Tour to your church or campus

Follow Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

From the Magazine & Blog

A campus appearance by Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the outspoken Muslim-turned-atheist activist, is being challenged again, this time at Yale University where she is scheduled to speak Sept. 15.
As we listen to Ferguson, we can learn from Ferguson – just as we learn from Montgomery and from South Africa. Many of the worst pits of oppression have later become the brightest beacons of hope.
The school-to-prison pipeline is a moral and racial justice crisis. Solving the problem will require an all-hands-on-deck solution.
It’s tough to ignore the glaring racial disparities at the center of America’s prison industrial complex. As an African-American woman, Christian, and mother, it breaks my heart and, at times, even tests the limits of my faith. But I also believe in a faith that can move mountains. When it comes to our nation’s criminal justice system, we’ve got mountains to move.
Implicit bias does not ask why. It only takes surface observation and draws lines of quick logic: These circumstances are reserved for criminals. Therefore, these people are criminals.