The Common Good

Uncommon seeks to address racial and economic divides by offering college campuses a race and poverty speaking tour that will build and strengthen the capacity of your community to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity. Find out how to bring the Tour to your church or campus!

Photo by Seph Kumer (First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant)

"[Lisa] awoke my senses to the beauty and amazement of the gospel. She spoke it with such fresh words and insight. She opened her mouth, and the Spirit of God poured out onto this dry and thirsty heart of mine. I felt as if I was once again alive to God's call for justice in this world.”

Discussion guides, documentaries, books, magazine articles, and more. Find all of the ways you can start the conversation about The Budget and Your Neighbor.

About Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

Racial and economic division persists in our world and within the body of Christ. The Uncommon Tour helps college campuses and churches to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity for the common good. Through preaching, teaching, and training Uncommon equips communities to engage issues of justice in the public square in a way that draws from the roots of Christianity and leads to ongoing advocacy in partnership with “the least of these.”

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From the Magazine & Blog

It can be comforting to think that the police protect us from the “bad guys,” unless of course you are profiled as that “bad guy.” This is otherizing, and it’s effect is to dehumanize.
Bonhoeffer’s relationship with Harlem is somewhat ambiguous for the Bonhoeffer that Marsh constructs. Instead, he emphasizes Bonhoeffer’s travels through the Jim Crow South, positioning the south (or, southern blackness) over against the north or northern, Harlem blackness as the primary source of African-American Christian influence on Bonhoeffer.
ST. LOUIS — Justice was a recurring theme as thousands of mourners packed the mammoth Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church on Monday for the funeral of Michael Brown, a black teen whose fatal shooting following a confrontation with a white police officer set off weeks of sometimes violent protests.
All acknowledge that the Nation of Islam has been a key player since the very beginning of the Ferguson protests.
Please try a few or all of these pathways, and add some of your own, and let’s stand up and be counted in this moment of great pain and anxiety for our nation. It is time, as Bill Hybels continually admonishes, for “the church to be the hope of the world.”