The Common Good

Uncommon seeks to address racial and economic divides by offering college campuses a race and poverty speaking tour that will build and strengthen the capacity of your community to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity. Find out how to bring the Tour to your church or campus!

Photo by Seph Kumer (First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant)

"[Lisa] awoke my senses to the beauty and amazement of the gospel. She spoke it with such fresh words and insight. She opened her mouth, and the Spirit of God poured out onto this dry and thirsty heart of mine. I felt as if I was once again alive to God's call for justice in this world.”

Discussion guides, documentaries, books, magazine articles, and more. Find all of the ways you can start the conversation about The Budget and Your Neighbor.

About Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

Racial and economic division persists in our world and within the body of Christ. The Uncommon Tour helps college campuses and churches to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity for the common good. Through preaching, teaching, and training Uncommon equips communities to engage issues of justice in the public square in a way that draws from the roots of Christianity and leads to ongoing advocacy in partnership with “the least of these.”

Learn more about the issues and solutions

 

Hear what others are saying about UnCommon

 

Invite the UnCommon Tour to your church or campus

 

 

Follow Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

From the Magazine & Blog

If there is anything I learned from my Monday night glued to television screens watching my former home of St. Louis in flames it’s that this “conversation” everyone keeps saying we need to have is happening in two different languages.
Well, call me the Scrooge of Thanksgiving, but I’m just not feeling thankful. The more someone tells me to “Be thankful!” the more I feel a sense of despair.
We now all have the chance to examine the evidence — released last night — in the grand jury’s decision not to indict white police officer Darren Wilson, who fired multiple bullets into Michael Brown. But the verdict on America’s criminal justice system is already in for many Americans: guilty, for treating young black men differently than young white men.
A grand jury has found that no probable cause exists to indict Darren Wilson, the Ferguson, Mo., police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown, on Aug. 9, said St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert P. McCulloch on Monday evening.
All eyes are on the jury, yet many of us who are watching realize that the real power does not reside in Gov. Jay Nixon or the grand jury, but in us. Just as it is the crowd who sways Pilate to crucify Jesus, so it is we who can determine whether justice comes in Ferguson and everywhere where racism exists.