The Common Good

Uncommon seeks to address racial and economic divides by offering college campuses a race and poverty speaking tour that will build and strengthen the capacity of your community to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity. Find out how to bring the Tour to your church or campus!

Photo by Seph Kumer (First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant)

"[Lisa] awoke my senses to the beauty and amazement of the gospel. She spoke it with such fresh words and insight. She opened her mouth, and the Spirit of God poured out onto this dry and thirsty heart of mine. I felt as if I was once again alive to God's call for justice in this world.”

Discussion guides, documentaries, books, magazine articles, and more. Find all of the ways you can start the conversation about The Budget and Your Neighbor.

About Sojourners The Uncommon Tour

Racial and economic division persists in our world and within the body of Christ. The Uncommon Tour helps college campuses and churches to make the connection between faith, poverty, and racial equity for the common good. Through preaching, teaching, and training Uncommon equips communities to engage issues of justice in the public square in a way that draws from the roots of Christianity and leads to ongoing advocacy in partnership with “the least of these.”

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From the Magazine & Blog

Right now when I see the lived reality of the church in our world, it seems we are more in a state of dis-union than communion.
Each episode presents a universal situation that pushes a particular issue of culture within the African-American community. Ultimately, the situation presses the question: “What does it means to be black?”
Looking at more than 1,400 evangelical organizations, researchers for the Women in Leadership National Study found that women held 21 percent of board positions, 19 percent of top-paid leadership roles and 16 percent of CEO posts in 2010. In comparison, women make up 43 percent of nonprofit boards and 40 percent of CEOs in the general marketplace.
I’ve been struck by the way that Forgive Us is a clarion call to not be conformed to the patters of this world. Chapter by chapter the authors demonstrate the dastardly consequences of complicity.
Coming to Ferguson was about Michael Brown. But Ferguson has also become a parable for our nation. Jesus often told parables. A parable is just a story, but often one with a simple but important point.