The Common Good
The Shriver Report examines the problem of poverty as it pertains to women. Phot

Despite the seemingly overwhelming odds facing women, it is encouraging to see how so many are truly pushing back from the brink. It is time to make public and personal commitments to support our mothers, wives, sisters, and daughters, who are disproportionately bearing the burdens of poverty.

The author's daughter. Photo by Brandon Hook

Being the future mother of a girl, I had grand ideas about “protecting” her from human-made gender norms. ... And then this week I caught myself doing something that has the potential to harm my daughter more than being drenched in pink and purple for the next 18 years ever could.

Gender equality wordcloud, mypokcik / Shutterstock.com

God, the founder of my Christian faith, does not undermine God’s own teaching. To deny women are equal is to deny what God has said is equal. It is people who are undermining religion, not religion undermining women or other people groups.

Sexual harassment and abuse to clergy, specifically clergywomen, is often swept

Today churches are often rocked with sexual harassment and abuse perpetrated by priests and clergy. Yet, sexual harassment and abuse to clergy, specifically clergywomen, is often swept under the rug.

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God created us male and female and said it was good, but America is ensuring that it is pretty bad to be a woman. If the world God envisions is open to everyone, then we need to do our part to make sure that women (over half the population), are just as able to succeed as men.

About Sojourners Women & Girls

Women are made God’s image and likeness (Genesis 1:27). When Christians embrace this as a core tenet of faith, we can model the human family as God created it to be. All Christians — regardless of gender — are called by God to exercise their gifts with equal authority and equal responsibility. As it says in the early church’s baptismal covenant, “There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:8).

Since the 1970s, Sojourners has been committed to resisting sexism in all its forms, while affirming the integrity and equality of women and men in the church and in the larger world. Sojourners magazine was one of the first evangelical publications to lift up feminism, and today a new generation is looking to us as a “go-to” place for perspectives on gender justice and women’s voices in faith communities.

Through Sojourners’ expanded multimedia platforms and growing network of partnerships, we are lifting up diverse women’s voices who are passionate about justice and motivated by their faith. Through biblical education, creative advocacy, and bridge building, we champion policies at home and abroad that fortify women’s health and dignity through eliminating gender discrimination and abuse, supporting pay equity, and increase economic empowerment.

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From the Magazine & Blog

This epidemic is about so much more than Goodell, whose lack of leadership is typical in professional sports. It’s about more than one team, one league, or sports in general.
Sunday night, 23-year old Kira Kazantsev proved two things when she was crowned Miss America for 2015. First, she can make a nationally television audience “happy” by using only a red plastic cup. Second, domestic violence knows no bounds.
New Jersey is often dismissed as a cultural wasteland of traffic jams and suburban sprawl, mobster graveyards and lost dreams — source material for native son rockers like Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi.
This week, the Baltimore Ravens terminated the contract of star running back Ray Rice after video of Rice beating his then-fiancée Janay emerged online. Rice had previously been suspended for two games for the assault. With the release of the video, media scrutiny swiftly turned to his now-wife, speculating over why she would marry her abuser. Beverly Gooden, a human resources manager and blogger, had a different response. Herself a survivor of domestic abuse, Gooden began tweeting of her own experiences, each one a vulnerable explanation: #WhyIStayed. Gooden wrote, “I can't speak for Janay Rice, but I can speak for Beverly Gooden. Why did I stay? … Leaving was a process, not an event. And sometimes it takes awhile to navigate through the process. ...I hope those tweeting using #WhyIStayed find a voice, find love, find compassion, and find hope.” The hashtag, #WhyIStayed, began to trend on Twitter on Monday and was quickly followed up by another hashtag, #WhyILeft. Both hashtags carry with them stories abuse in every form — emotional, verbal, psychological, spiritual, sexual, physical — and document the horrific toll it can take on victims’ mind, body, and spirit. Together, they paint a heartbreaking picture of just how ubiquitous and varied abuse can be. Still, there are some patterns that emerge. Many stories of #WhyIStayed point to warped gender expectations — for women, that their worth is in loyalty, purity, and ‘taking it in stride;’ men, the assumption that ‘real men’ don’t suffer abuse. Others detail the very real economic, physical, or social barriers to getting out of an abusive relationship; still others the central role that concern for their children plays in decisions to stay or leave. And yes, some point directly to narratives from influential Christian voices, demonstrating — counter to the perception of many pastors in the ‘Broken Silence’ poll Sojourners released in June — that abuse happens within the Church. The good news here are these tweets themselves. Darkness cannot expand where light streams in — and by telling and sharing these stories on the most social of platforms, each person speaking up is opening the door one step further on this dark sin. We would all do well to listen. Some of the most powerful tweets below.
When I was a university student, more and more people were getting cell phones that had cameras — a trend I only noticed when signs in the women’s locker room went up, warning that using cell phones in that space was strictly prohibited for reasons of privacy. It’s alarmingly easy to take pictures of someone without their knowing. You can pretend to be writing a text message when, in fact, you’re capturing someone’s image and then posting it on the Internet for anyone to see. That’s bad manners, of course, if we’re talking about simply posting unflattering photos — and even more morally and ethically questionable if the subjects are in a partial or total state of undress. But even when a person consents to be photographed nude, if those private images end up on the Internet — as roughly 200 such celebrity photographs did last weekend — it can be surprisingly difficult to get them removed. 4Chan, the anonymous message boards where the images first appeared, and Reddit, where they were posted and shared widely, are able to claim that Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996allows them to deny responsibility for the content that’s posted to their site by individual users. They certainly have the capability to remove such images, but they don’t want to — and the law doesn’t compel them to. As Emily Bazelon noted in Slate, Reddit moved quickly to delete nude photographs of Olympic gymnast McKayla Maroney taken while she was underage. “It’s not that Reddit is too shady to care about the law,” Bazelon writes. “It’s that there is no clear legal risk in continuing to host involuntary porn of adults.”