The Common Good

The Christian Post

The Christian Post Press Items
11/04/2005
Religious leaders prayed on Capitol Hill Thursday and urged Congress not to approve proposed changes to the 2006 budget plan that would make mild cuts to health care programs for the elderly, poor and disabled.
10/27/2005
The 2005 convocation will bring together some of the most influential speakers on this topic, including the Rev. Jim Wallis, author and founder of <i>Sojourners</i>.
10/27/2005
"We all need to speak," said Sojourners Executive Director Jim Wallis during a press conference Wednesday, calling the budget cuts on the Food Stamp Program a "biblical alarm on the poor people."
10/19/2005
Yesterday, the Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, and the Rev. Jim Wallis, convener of Sojourners and Call to Renewal &ndash; both of whom have been at the forefront of the hunger issue &ndash; received word that U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), head of the Senate Agriculture Committee, removed the Food Stamp Program from proposed cuts.
09/18/2005
"We were able to meet with one of the deputies at the U.S. mission, the state department, and an official from USAID," said Adam Taylor, an organizer with Sojourners magazine.
09/15/2005
As heads of states and governments gathered in New York to begin the United Nations World Summit on Wednesday, top Evangelical leaders called for a "new war against global hunger" at an interfaith prayer service held near the U.N. building.
09/15/2005
On the first day of the 2005 World Summit at the United Nations in New York, over 22 American religious leaders gathered outside the United Nations to call on the Bush Administration to deliver on the promise to halve world poverty by 2015.
09/14/2005
As world leaders gather in New York for the United Nations World Summit, religious leaders and faith-based community members will be praying and fasting to overcome global poverty, disease and despair.
06/30/2005
Jim Wallis, Director of the peace and justice network Sojourners who co-organized the event, called the daily death of 30,000 children from poverty a "silent tsunami."