The Common Good

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Observing the 10th Anniversary of 9/11 by Sharing Faith

The email came just a few days before two Jewish rabbis and two Muslim friends joined two of us Christian ministers for a Sunday morning service. This service was part of a national event called Faith Shared.

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Environmental Activist Anna Clark: 'Christians Must Conserve Resources'

At the Wild Goose Festival in North Carolina last weekend, I was able to speak with Anna Clark, author of Green, American Style, president and founder of EarthPeople, a green consulting firm, and a contributor to Taking Flight: Reclaiming the Female Half of God's Image Through Advocacy and Renewal. Anna has a heart for equipping churches to make small and big changes for the sake of creation care and stewardship of the earth's resources. How can Christians do this, you ask? Read our conversation to find out.

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From Your Gas Tank to World Hunger: The Dangers of Speculative Futures

Wall Street may seem far away, but it's actually as near as your gas tank -- and as widespread as global hunger.
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10 Ways Pastors Muck It Up

After posting a blog about my observations of a dying church, there were comments gi
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More Great Summer Reading Ideas

In addition to my summer reading recommendations from the other day, I need to mention a few more.
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Why I Love Fire, Pentecost, and the Beloved Community

This past weekend, Christians around the world celebrated one of our holiest holi-days: Pentecost. Pentecost, which means "50 days," is celebrated seven weeks after Easter (hence the 50), and marks the birthday of the Church, when the Holy Spirit is said to have fallen on the early Christian community like fire from the heavens. (For this reason, lots of Christians wear red and decorate in pyro-colors. This day is also where the fiery Pentecostal movement draws its name).

But what does Pentecost Sunday have to do with just another manic Monday?

What does a religious event a couple of thousand years old have to offer the contemporary, pluralistic, post-Christian world we live in? I'd say a whole lot. Here's why:

Let me start by confessing my bias. Not only am I a Christian, but I am a Christian who likes fire. I went to circus school and became a fire-swallowing, fire-breathing, torch-juggling-pyro-maniac as you'll see here. So naturally, I like Pentecost.

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Why Do Christians Think It's Blasphemous to Doubt?

Not too long ago, a family member told me in hushed sad tones that he was praying for me. I wasn't ill. I wasn't going through a tough time. No.
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Congressman Weiner and the Rules of Decent Behavior

Just a couple of weeks ago I wrote the following in response to news about Arnold
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Ordinary People and Just Peace in the Middle East

When we think about world events, we often think about them in relation to larger-than-life people -- the leaders of nations or of revolutions.
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In a Broken World, I Long for Peace

Like all of you, I was stunned some days ago as I started soaking in the breaking news of Osama bin Laden's capture and death via U.S. military operations.
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