The Common Good
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If things are ever going to change in this country, we need to start by educating others and letting them know that a different world is possible. It’s not going to be easy and it won’t happen overnight but we can’t stand idly by as lives are lost needlessly every day.

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I’m afraid if we believe there is only room enough for one kind of pain, then we declare there is room enough for only one kind of solution. We forget the most powerful resource we have to combat injustice is humanity’s ever expanding potential to be creative, to labor with tenacity, and to love.

Man on the Street DC/flickr.com

I’ve found D.C. to be far beyond the House of Cards-meets-Cherry Blossom Festival sketch beloved by press and many residents alike. In my daily experience, D.C. is collaborative, generous, and deserving of accolades in ways that continually surprise.

Photo by Heather Wilson/PICO

by Jim Wallis
Thus far, there is little evidence that public officials in Ferguson and St. Louis County have the courage to alter their behavior and their systematic responses to young men and women of color in their communities. So faith leaders came to help begin the process of repentance.

Photo via Cathleen Falsani

I wanted to touch it, to hold it in my hands, feel the weight of the heavy white vinyl albums, and smell that new-album-smell that in a split second transcends the time-space continuum and transports me back to my teenage self, completely enraptured by the music. Escape. Refuge. Prophet. Solace. Friend.

Controversial megachurch pastor Mark Driscoll. Photo courtesy of Mars Hill Churc
Mark Driscoll, the larger-than-life megachurch pastor resigned from his Seattle church Oct. 15, writing in part, "... I do not want to be the source of anything that might detract from our church’s mission to lead people to a personal and growing relationship with Jesus Christ.”

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